Scotchtown is the only original standing home of Patrick Henry, patriot and orator of the American Revolution, open to the public. Henry lived here from 1771 to 1778 and conceived his most influential revolutionary ideas at the home, including his famous “Liberty or Death” speech.

Built around 1720 by Charles Chiswell, Scotchtown is architecturally unique. It features eight large rooms and a central passage below a large, undivided attic. The house is surrounded by reproduction outbuildings and gardens.

Scotchtown was acquired by Preservation Virginia in 1958 and restored to its appearance during Patrick Henry’s life.

Address

16120 Chiswell Lane,
Beaverdam, Virginia 23015

Hours

March 2 through December 30

Fri and Sat: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m

PLAN YOUR VISIT

Explore the life and legacy of Patrick Henry, patriot and orator of the American Revolution.

Plan your visit

Guided Tours

In a 45-minute tour guided by our trained interpreters, you’ll learn about the life and legacy of Patrick Henry. Engage with fellow visitors and discuss Henry’s ideals of liberty, human rights and revolution, and the ways those ideas influence us today.

In addition to our regular museum tour, we will begin offering our special “Patrick Henry: Champion of Religious Freedom,” tour Sundays at 2:30 p.m. on October 7. Our interpreters will take guests through Henry’s journey as a defender of religious freedom in colonial America. Tickets can be purchased in advance through Eventbrite:

Self-Guided Exhibits

Walk through our two-room exhibit that showcases Henry’s legacy and then stroll the grounds and outbuildings. Meet our sheep, Lady Flufferface, Winston, Studley and Charles “Charlie” Chiswell.

Cell Phone Tour

Tour the grounds even when we’re closed with a guided cell phone tour.

Covered Pavilion

Pack a lunch and eat under our covered pavilion. We have 12 picnic tables that seat up to 50 people. Recharge your phone while you eat; electrical outlets are available.

Hours & Directions

March 2 through December 30

Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m

Celebrate the Holidays with "A Patrick Henry Christmas"

Christmas is coming early to Scotchtown on December 8! Get your tickets for a truly unique holiday celebration with light 18th century refreshments, dancing, music and more!

Learn more

Admission

Pricing

Preservation MembersFree (Become a member)
General Admission$10
AAA, Senior (60+), Military Discount$9
Students$7
Children under 6Free

Buy a Block Ticket to visit Patrick Henry’s Scotchtown and the John Marshall House for one special price, $14.

Call ahead and reserve a special discounted rate for groups of ten or more. Group tours are available by arrangements made no less than one week in advance of the visit.

Contact

For information on pricing and availability:

Inquire about SCOTCHTOWN

scotchtown@preservationvirginia.org
804-227-3500

Tours & Site Rental

Patrick Henry’s Scotchtown is a beautifully restored 18th century plantation home located just north of Ashland, Virginia and 25 minutes from Richmond. Make your event truly special with Scotchtown’s unique blend of colonial Virginia architecture, history and beautiful natural surroundings.

Site Rental & Special Events

Meeting Space: Rent our Community Center, with space for up to 25 for your small group meetings and events.

Special Events: Reserve space in our outdoor covered
pavilion or rent our grounds for your special occasion!

Group Tour Bookings

Group tours are available by arrangements made no less than one week in advance of the visit.

Contact

For information on pricing and availability:

Inquire about SCOTCHTOWN

scotchtown@preservationvirginia.org
804-227-3500

Patrick Henry's Scotchtown is a partner of the American Evolution 2019 Commemoration

AMERICAN EVOLUTION™ commemorates the 400th anniversary of several key historical events that occurred in Virginia in 1619 that continue to influence America today, including the first representative legislative assembly in the New World, the arrival of the first recorded enslaved Africans to English North America and the recruitment of English women in significant numbers.